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PUBLIC ASKED TO HELP PROTECT THE NATION

posted Apr 13, 2016, 7:17 AM by PHS Warrior Beat

By: Sarah Grant

    The United States Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) wants your ideas of how to turn everyday objects into weapons. A cash prize will be awarded to those Americans who can turn everyday electronics into weapons and bombs. DARPA’s objective according to Fox News is to “identify off-the-shelf products that could be adapted by bad guys to pose a threat to Americans.” A successful creator could win up to $130,000.

    DARPA advertises this opportunity, “Improv”, as “your chance to help give the US military the element of surprise.” They have reached out to engineers and biologists for suggestions, along with other experts. They say that “any type of commercially available product that could be weaponized is fair game.” Some ideas for materials that DARPA gave included cell phones, model airplanes, skydiving, and scuba-diving equipment, toys, coffee makers, and even hair dryers.

    The goal is to give DARPA strategic surprise. This could be your chance to help play a role in national security and join the world’s largest red team. “Red teams adopt an adversary’s perspective and challenge conventional wisdom strategy. A red team member helps find vulnerabilities and anticipate threats.”


 Terrorists have used simple everyday items to make bombs that do substantial damage. For example in 2006 a liquid bomb was disguised as ordinary liquids and in 2010 a printer cartridge contained explosives. As part of national defense, DARPA is trying to get a one up in order to prevent terror attacks. They want to see what can be made quickly on a tight budget.

     “The awards are expected to be up to $40,000 per individual in the first phase. For the second phase, the prize could be up to $70,000 per individual. The final prototype phase could be up to $20,000 per individual award.” Public input would not only win a lot of money, it can protect the country.

Edited By: GE Uploaded: 4/13/2016


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